Hidden in Plain Sight.

Winter has set upon us as the holidays draw near.

Every year gone by represents a time of wonder and quiet reflection.  As is the custom, this season will be marked with festive gatherings of families and friends.

But for some citizens in our great society, these days are filled with darkness.  We pass by them everyday, pretending they are not us.  Yet they live on, cast offs of a family no longer seen.  Like lost souls having fallen from grace, these individuals become broken and destitute, often existing without aid.

We have listened as politicians invoke the Judeo-Christian ethic, promising the moon in exchange for a vote.  As a new Congress prepares to be seated, we should demand they create lasting policy aimed at helping all the less fortunate living among us.  This is what any righteous society would do.

Teresa Wagner gets high off the fumes of a spray paint can. ©Eli Reichman, 1985/2010. All Rights Reserved.

"When I was a kid, we swam a lot and played football and baseball. I was well behaved and well spoken. Same way I am now." Manuel Bielma. ©Eli Reichman, 1985/2010. All Rights Reserved.

"When we got to Muskogee, man, he didn't know how to get to Louisiana. We were supposed to go there and make a lot of money. The dude, he left. I stayed here." Manuel Carillo. ©Eli Reichman, 1985/2010. All Rights Reserved.

"They call me 'the Mayor' because I used to wear a tie. I got rolled so many times and they cut my tie off. The last time I wore a tie was to a funeral. A guy committed suicide." Ira Hudgens. ©Eli Reichman, 1985/2010. All Rights Reserved.

Teresa Wagner staggers from another hit of the spray paint. ©Eli Reichman, 1985/2010. All Rights Reserved.

Teresa Wagner loses consciousness from sniffing paint fumes. ©Eli Reichman, 1985/2010. All Rights Reserved.

Teresa Wagner returns to her makeshift home on the north side of downtown Tulsa, OK. ©Eli Reichman, 1985/2010. All Rights Reserved.

 

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8 thoughts on “Hidden in Plain Sight.

  1. Hi Eli, I found yr blog thru Jon Wright. I wholly agree with yr comments which are brought to life by yr evocative images. We are visual creatures on the whole and if people don’t see something they don’t care about it, or at least it is easier not to think about it.

  2. You can’t just help but ache for those who struggle daily and many through no fault of their own. Thank you for keeping those who have so little in front of us. They will not be forgotten.

  3. Very sobering post. Most of us are blessed. We will help those in need.

  4. The line between having and not having is a thin and fragile one. Our circumstances and good fortune can change so quickly, which is why I never understand folks who pretend that “those people” really are not us. Thanks for sharing the photos, Eli.

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